Nature


Natural Landscapes, specific species and whole habitats looking for your vote.
 
Please read though the details below of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA.  A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 1 March (00.01 GMT) to 15 March (12.00 GMT) 2016.

If you would like to read and vote for the Nature projects in Italian, please click here.
Per la pagina in italiano sui progetti della sezione Natura, cliccare
qui.

 

Looking For Your Support

Black Vutlure.  Image Pinto Moreira

Nominated by:

Black Vulture Recovery, Southern Portugal

Website: http://www.lpn.pt

The Eurasian Black Vulture is Europe’s largest raptor, breeding mostly in woodlands in hilly areas and feeding on livestock and wild ungulate carcasses, thus being a key species in Mediterranean ecosystems. However, laws requiring farmers to collect dead animals for incineration resulted in food shortages and prevented its comeback in Portugal. Artificial nests and a network of feeding stations were recently introduced and the species started rebreeding after more than 40 years. This project aims to resettle a breeding population of Black Vulture in Southern Portugal, keeping it sustainable and compatible with local economic activities such as farming, game hunting and eco tourism.  Besides supplying the feeding stations, a hide will be built next to one of them where visitors may also see Griffon Vultures, Golden Eagles, and even Iberian Imperial Eagles.  Information and tours will be given to locals as well as educational activities aimed at engaging local schools.

Voting has ended
Red Ruffed Lemur.  Image Julie Larsen Maher

Nominated by:

Conservation of the Silky Sifaka and Red-Ruffed Lemur, Madagascar

Website: http://madagascar.wcs.org

This project aims to protect 2 species of critically endangered lemur found in the Antsahabe Forest in Makira Natural Park, a 372,000 hectare protected area managed by WCS on behalf of the Government of Madagascar that contains the country’s largest remaining stands of tropical rainforest and is the only place where both species are found in the same location. The major threats to the lemurs are habitat loss due to slash and burn agriculture, trapping for food and collection of non-timber forest products.  The project will develop alternative livelihoods through eco tourism, working with local tour operators to train local guides and build their expertise.  It will also monitor lemur populations, carry out anti poaching patrols and remove snares.  There will be community education in schools, workshops and events.  Trekking trails, river trips and wildlife watching are all already offered and will be extended over the next few years.

Voting has ended
Galapagos Eco-Club.  Image Dr Stephen Blake

Nominated by:

Engaging Local Youth in Conserving the Galapagos Tortoise

Website: http://www.ecologyproject.org

Despite being among the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Galapagos Islands’ fragile habitats and iconic species are at risk due to lack of effective protection efforts. The Galapagos giant tortoise is threatened by invasive species, habitat loss, and minimal engagement of local residents in conservation. In partnership with Galapagos National Park, this project engages local, disadvantaged youth in experiential education and applied conservation of Galapagos tortoises. At least 250 students from all nine high schools in Galapagos will participate in one of 15 four-day field courses, helping researchers collect biometric and population data on tortoises in the wild, removing at least 6000m2 of invasive plant species, and studying tortoise feeding ecology. Tortoise nests will be monitored and captive-raised hatchlings released. In addition, at least 600 youth will take part in projects like beach clean ups and career mentoring, ensuring long-term local investment in protection of this exceptional archipelago.

Voting has ended
Humbpack Breaching.  Image V.Vivadelli/WDC

Nominated by:

Humpback Whales in the Eastern Caribbean

Website: http://www.whales.org

The Eastern Caribbean is the breeding area for a newly discovered sub population of humpback whales. These whales face numerous human induced threats throughout their range including vessel strikes, entanglements in nets, chemical and noise pollution, and hunting. By working with local conservation experts in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, this project will implement a successfully tested model for a community-based eco-tourism operation that will benefit both whales and the local community. The goal is to promote the conservation of this distinct population of whales through the development of responsible whale watching while respecting the cultural legacy of the community. Funding will assist in the delivery of responsible whale watch trainings for local operators, in-school educational programmes for students, and a tourist-based citizen scientist programme that can help provide necessary data to better understand and protect this unique and less known population of humpback whales.

Voting has ended
Angel Shark.  Image Eleonora de Sabata

Nominated by:

Stellaris Project, Italy

Website: http://www.medsharks.org

The Mediterranean is one of the world’s hotspots of biodiversity but three quarters of its sharks and rays are on the Red List of Endangered Species. The nursehound catshark is one of those, having suffered in some areas an astonishing 99% decline.  The Stellaris project works to protect its largest known nursery (offshore Naples, Italy) by restoring the habitat - plagued with lost fishing lines threatening sharks and all marine life - and building more sustainable diving and fishing tourism.  With help from EOCA, this project will conduct two years of regular seafloor clean-ups, increase outreach and organise an annual public event of fun dives and shark talks, where volunteer divers will remove lost fishing gear and marine litter.  The project will also monitor the babies' progress as they develop for 8 months into tiny sharks and involve fishers and authorities to ensure protection of their parents

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
    The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust