Nature


Natural Landscapes, specific species and whole habitats looking for your vote.
 
Please read though the details below of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA.  A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 9 March (00.01 GMT) to 23 March (12.00 GMT) 2015.
 

Looking For Your Support

Barn Owl

Nominated by:

AgroS.O.S.tainable Phase II, Spain 

Website: http://www.brinzal.org

In recent years, the abandonment of the countryside and the use of intensive crop systems has lead to the progressive loss of habitat necessary for the long-term sustainability of populations of many endangered bird species in the project area near Madrid. Many species of Steppe birds including Great Bustard, various owls and harriers, stone curlews and also sand grouse are being lost due to farming practices. Through this project, Brinzal will work with farmers in an area of 1000 hectares to encourage activities to provide beneficial habitats for these birds, such as extensive farming techniques, organic farming, providing nesting sites and perching sites for birds including raptors and tree planting. It will also work with local municipalities and media to promote walking and bird watching in the area to demonstrate the value of these farming practices.

Voting has ended
Angel shark. Photo credit Carlos Suarez, Oceanos le Fuego

Nominated by:

Angel Shark Conservation, Canary Islands

Website: http://www.zsl.org/angelsharks

The Critically Endangered angel shark, once widespread throughout Europe’s seas, is now extinct from much of its historic range. One last stronghold remains in the Canary Islands, however, a rapidly expanding sportfishing community using lethal handling techniques is threatening their survival. This project will work closely with the sportfishing community in Lanzorote, distributing a best practice guide to catch and release, training them to minimise handling time, stress and damage to any angel sharks they accidently encounter during their routine fishing activities. The project will also work with thousands of divers, training them to become effective citizen scientists, abiding by an angel shark code of conduct, and inspiring them to actively help conservation by submitting angel shark sightings to the Poseidon Programme. Combined the records from the sport fishing and diving communities will reveal previously unknown ecological data on the distribution and abundance of this secretive species. This will be used to identify critical angel shark habitats and formulate the basis of a robust and evidence-based angel shark conservation strategy thus ensuring the survival of the angel shark in Europe.

Voting has ended
Sangai Deer

Nominated by:

Community Action to Protect the Sangai Deer, India

Website: http://www.cdomanipur.in

Sangai deer are listed as endangered by IUCN. They are found in the state of Manipur in the marshy wetlands of the threatened Loktak Lake, the largest fresh water lake in Eastern India and one of the seven Ramsar sites of International importance. The deer are threatened by poaching, fishing activities, reduction in food, inbreeding and disease, flooding of habitat and drowning. Through this project, Community Development Organisation (CDO) would prevent destruction of Sangai habitat by encroachment, overexploitation of habitat resources and poaching through environmental education programmes. Food shortages and drowning caused by flooding in rainy seasons would be addressed by planting 50,000 Sangai food plants and constructing dry shelters in elevated locations. Vaccination will be given to the deer for communicable diseases as well as treatment for sick animals. Finally, 4 watch towers will be constructed to enable volunteers to identify any dangers and poaching activities, and tourists to view the Sangai and the surrounding habitats.

Voting has ended
Manta Birostris. Image: Mark Harding

Nominated by:

Conservation of Giant Manta Rays, Peru

Website: http://www.facebook.com

The Giant Manta Ray is an iconic species threatened with extinction. What is believed to be one of the world’s most significant populations of these rays migrates seasonally from Ecuador, where they are legally protected, into northern Peru, where they are not. Here, research has highlighted that unmanaged and unmonitored fishing harvests a large proportion of pregnant females, suggesting the presence of an important reproduction area and nursery habitat in Peruvian waters. This finding heightens the urgency for protection of this site as Giant Mantas have an extremely slow reproductive rate. This project aims to protect the Giant Manta Rays in Peru by conducting research to identify the most critical habitats which in turn will encourage protection of the species by local authorities. Training courses will also provide an alternative source of income for artisanal fishermen through the development of Manta Ray ecotourism. Finally, education and outreach, including workshops at local schools will ensure community engagement and support for protecting Manta Rays.

Voting has ended
Rainforest in Ecuador. Photo credit Kelo Zuniga

Nominated by:

Enlargement of the JATUN SISA Botanical Garden

Website: http://www.facebook.com

The current 53 hectares of the Jatun Sisa Botanical Garden and Santuary of Wildlife is made up of primary tropical rainforest and is permanently protected by the organisation from threats such as hunting, collection and extraction of plants, livestock grazing and timber exploitation in Pastaza, Ecuador. It is managed by a multidisciplinary team, for the benefit of the forest, for research, education and ecotourism. Funding for this project will be used to purchase a further 40 hectares of forest adjacent to the existing 53 hectares, to protect its biodiversity from being lost forever. The Wildlife sanctuary would therefore be extended. Trails and signage in the new area would also be developed to enable tourists and students to explore and study it.

Voting has ended
A gorilla in the forest

Nominated by:

Reducing threats to Cross River Gorillas, Nigeria.

The tropical rainforests of Cross River State in Okwangwo, Nigeria are recognised as a biological hotspot of global significance, supporting over 60% of Nigeria’s endangered plants and animals and numerous endangered primates most notably the cross river gorilla. The cross river gorilla is only found along the southern section of the Nigeria-Cameroon border and there are thought to be less than 300 individuals left. Logging, farming, and hunting are the major threats to the gorillas in the area. The Okwangwo Conservation Society aims to reduce threats faced by gorillas by training 40 hunters in snail farming and beekeeping, thereby creating alternative sources of food and income, and reducing fires and habitat destruction which often result from wild honey collection. The project will also facilitate conservation education and establish 40,000 seedlings of Bushmango and afang, important non timber forest products currently unsustainably harvested from the forest and important for household income. Ecotourism will strengthen the protection and integrity of resources which tourists will pay to see.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust