Nature


Natural Landscapes, specific species and whole habitats looking for your vote.
 
Please read though the details below of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA.  A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 9 March (00.01 GMT) to 23 March (12.00 GMT) 2017.
 

Looking For Your Support


Nominated by:

Chittagong Hill Tracts Program

Website: http://www.conservationalliance.org

This project is a sustainable, community-owned conservation initiative that empowers indigenous tribesmen to be stewards of their own unique and endangered ecosystem, heritage, and culture. Through the exchange of incentives in a pilot project, the Creative Conservation Alliance has successfully reduced hunting pressure on 15 species by 50% in the last remaining primary tropical forest in Bangladesh. The communities sign moratoriums on hunting of species in return for new schools and improved market access for their craft products, thus reducing hunting. This area harbours the very last in-country populations of several species of turtles as well as clouded leopards, Chinese pangolins, Asian elephants and sun bears. Expanding this programme by providing these incentives and employing ten more parabiologists -local, reformed indigenous hunters to monitor wildlife, illegal wildlife trade and logging and be conservation ambassadors for the region- will significantly relieve subsistence hunting pressure throughout the region.

Voting has ended
Photo credit © Tsavo Conservation Group

Nominated by:

eMAP (Elephant Monitoring and Anti-Poaching) - Tsavo, Kenya

Website: http://www.tsavocon.org

Taita Ranches and Conservancies in the greater Tsavo ecosystem seasonally host the highest concentration of elephants in Kenya and are a popular tourist destination, but also suffer high rates of poaching – with 60% of all poaching in Kenya in 2014 occurring in Tsavo ecosystem. It also has the highest incidence of human-elephant conflict in the country, resulting in resentment from the local communities. This project, proposed by Tsavo Conservation Group, will deploy a comprehensive, community based elephant monitoring network across the entire Taita ecosystem. Recruited from local communities and trained professionally, a team of 14 eMAP monitors, each responsible for a specific zone, will collate vital data on poaching, human-elephant conflict and elephant movements. This will inform community anti-poaching operations spanning the 1.4 million-acre expanse of the Taita Ranches and Conservancies and support the design and implementation of appropriate human-elephant conflict mitigation measures in this region.

Voting has ended
Photo credits:Rick Prebeg, World Class Images

Nominated by:

Koldita Island Marine Protected Area and Management Plan

Website: http://www.seacology.org

The remote Koldita Island is part of the Chiloé Archipelago of southern Chile, and is home to a large amount of biodiversity in the area including endangered marine otters, blue whales and a number of endemic species. The communities there have obtained provisional management rights to the marine areas surrounding the island. A management plan is required for legal recognition; if the community does not submit a plan to the Chilean government within a year and get it approved, the area’s protected status will be lost. They have sought Seacology’s help to support this large marine protected area: development of the required management plan and the purchase of surveillance equipment, to help community members monitor the area and enforce the restrictions laid out in the plan. In exchange, the communities have agreed to protect the 12,630-acre marine protected area in perpetuity.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Mangrove Restoration, to improve Livelihoods, Great Aceh Regency, Indonesia

Website: http://www.yadesaaceh.org

The Banda Aceh area is still struggling the after effects of the 2004 tsunami. All of the mangroves were lost, resulting in the loss of habitat for small fish, which in turn has reduced food and income for the villagers. There is no shade from trees for locals or tourists and seawater now comes onto the land making it impossible to grow crops. Through this project, YADESA ACEH aims to address some of these issues by planting 45,000 mangrove seedlings and 400 fruit tree seeds in the Lam Guron area. 80 people will be trained by an expert in mangrove establishment and care, and will in turn supervise 468 families involved in the project. The community has offered up their own private lands in tidal areas to become community land planted with mangroves. Further inland, fruit trees will be planted as a source of income.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Restoring the Peatland of the Flow Country, Scotland

Website: http://www.rspb.org.uk/scotland

The Flow Country is a stunning blanket bog in north Scotland. This globally rare habitat is home to many special animals and plants including golden eagles and sundew. It is also the largest terrestrial carbon store in the UK. However, conifer plantations from the 1970s and 80s are drying out the peat, causing carbon release into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change, and reducing habitat for wildlife. RSPB Scotland is working with partners to restore areas of bog in the heart of the Flow Country and EOCA funding would transform 3.64ha of the Dyke plantation by felling the trees and blocking drains, thus raising the water table and allowing the bog to be restored naturally. Within 10-20 years, the area would become a world of amazing wildlife once more, a place to be inspired by peace and space, and an essential carbon store, helping to tackle climate change.

Voting has ended

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If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below. During 2017, all money donated will fund tree planting in Nepal as part of our 2 Million Tree Project.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust