Nature


Our Nature category of projects is supported by National Geographic Germany.  This will be the third year they have supported our online voting process. Six projects are competing for your votes in this category.
 
Please read though the details below of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year.  A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

If you would prefer to vote in German, you can do so on the National Geographic Germany website or on our German website.

Voting in this category runs from 17- 31 March 2014.
 

Looking For Your Support


Nominated by:

Batumi Raptor Trail Development, Georgia

Website: http://www.batumiraptorcount.org/research/raptor-conservation

The foothills of the Lesser Caucasus along the Black Sea coast in Georgia form one of the world’s biggest bottlenecks for migrating raptors. More than one million birds pass through this area during migration seasons in spring and autumn. At least 35 species of raptors have been observed and as many as 100,000 raptors migrating in a single day. However, this migration process is impacted by illegal and indiscriminate hunting - a deeply rooted tradition amongst local communities, killing between 7-9,000 raptors, among them a high proportion of endangered eagles and harriers. The area is well known and visited by bird watchers and hikers already, putting them in direct conflict with the hunters. Via Batumi Raptor Count, the project aims to increase the value of the raptors to the locals by increasing the visitors to the area, creating a raptor trail, connecting villages and observation points. It will also provide education and alternative means of income for locals.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Combating wildlife crime in the Leuser Ecosystem, Sumatra

Website: http://www.eyes-on-leuser.com

The Sumatran tiger, by many considered the most beautiful of all tiger sub species, is critically endangered. Less than 500 individuals survive in the wild and numbers are still declining. The vast Leuser Ecosystem in northern Sumatra is one of the last true wilderness areas of Southeast Asia and offers the best hope for the long term survival of this species. However, Leuser’s tigers are continuously threatened by professional tiger poaching, depletion of key prey species and habitat fragmentation due to the construction of new roads. Working in conjunction with local communities and the ministry of forestry, this project aims to establish long term and systematic anti-poaching patrols to keep Leuser’s most critical tiger breeding zones 100% free of snares. In addition, Forum Konservasi Leuser will be creating and distributing educational material to local tour guides and businesses and creating a long-term tiger strategy for the area is also part of this project. www.eyes-on-leuser.com

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Parrots and People; Trees and Trails, Bonaire

Website: http://www.echobonaire.org

This project will use the Yellow Shouldered Amazon Parrot to increase the perceived value of the dry-forest on the island of Bonaire in the Dutch Caribbean and drive habitat restoration. The only population of Yellow Shouldered Amazon Parrot outside Venezuela, this species is threatened due to loss of nesting habitat and food sources as well as the reduction of ground vegetation due to the introduction of goats, pigs and donkeys thereby reducing soil creation, water retention, increasing erosion and impacting coral reefs. Echo Bonaire will use this project to give value to the forest through the creation of 17km of new trails, improvement of trailhead facilities, herbivore exclusion areas and the planting of 20,000 native trees.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Project Miaro, South East Madagascar

Website: http://www.madagascar.co.uk

Madagascar is home to 4% of the Earth’s animal and plant species, many of which are threatened due to deforestation through slash and burn agriculture, climate change and mining activities. Through this project, Azafady aims to build the capacity of the local community to protect the Sainte Luce littoral forest, home to five species of lemur and the Critically Endangered P. Anatosy gecko. The project supports local people to provide alternative sources of timber, replant endangered palm species, and maintain firebreaks. Additionally, ecotourism infrastructure will be developed through the establishment of a trained guiding association and local representation improved through regional platforms. In total, the project involves the planting of 19,000 trees to reduce community dependency on forest fragments which play a crucial role in providing refuges for biodiversity.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Saving Armenia's Leopard

Website: http://www.worldlandtrust.org

There are fewer than 1,300 Caucasian leopards left in the wild, mainly in Iran, and as few as 10-15 in Armenia. The project aims to protect a vital leopard corridor by conserving threatened habitat and wildlife in Armenia’s Caucasian Wildlife Refuge, benefitting other threatened species such as the Syrian Brown Bear, Grey Wolf and Caspian Red Deer. The main threats are illegal hunting, overgrazing and unsustainable collection of wild crops. As well as habitat restoration involving planting 4,000 trees, the project will fund camera traps and field surveys to monitor wildlife. These measures will compliment on-going efforts to prevent illegal activities in the reserve, employing rangers and raising local awareness of the benefits of nature conservation. Through the project, the World Land Trust will also enhance recreational facilities, opening up controlled access for exploration on foot, bike and horseback and creating new trails thereby empowering local people to generate income through nature-based tourism.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Sea turtle conservation, Costa Rica

Website: http://www.latinamericanseaturtles.org

Pacuare Beach, northern Costa Rica, is an important nesting site for Leatherback and Green turtles, and some rare Hawksbill turtles, listed by the IUCN as ‘in danger’ or ‘in critical danger’ of extinction. 400-700 turtle nests a year are registered on this beach. The main threats are unsustainable fishing practices, exploitation by humans for food, habitat loss and pollution. Pacuare is a remote area, only accessible by boat and home to a small community. Latin American Sea Turtles will use this project to involve and train members of the local community and international volunteers/scientists to carry out beach patrols, build hatcheries, collect data, monitor nests, tag females, discourage poachers, replant trees and create a schools’ education and environmental outreach programme in order to protect the turtles at this important nest site.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust