Nature


This category contains those projects looking to restore, protect or enhance habitats and species around the world.  For wildlife and for people. (Image John Fleetwood)
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 28 March (00.01 GMT) to 11 April (12.00 BST) 2019.

 

Looking For Your Support

The dangers of ghost nets

Nominated by:

Bird Watching to Reduce Plastic Pollution, Brazil

Website: http://www.curicaca.org.br

The Lagoa do Peixe National Park (LPNP) protects migratory birds. The area is part of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network, with 273 bird species registered in the Park. The main tourist activity is bird watching, focused on the threatened species. The main threats to birds and endangered marine fauna are plastic waste pollution, ingestion, and damage to the natural landscape through the accumulation of debris on the beaches. This project will focus on reducing the plastic contamination in the habitat of endangered birds and other threatened animals, through clean up events, education and training. A workshop for teachers and local bird watching guides, a photographic exhibition highlighting the problem, clean up events and diagnosis of waste collected, awareness raising amongst fishermen regarding net disposal and the production of waste management plans for the local municipalities will involve more than 700 people, including school children, locals and visitors. The project aims to change the habits of the community via 20 beach cleans to clear 10km of beach and their surrounding habitats of plastic waste.

Voting has ended
Children of the Sea.  Image Byron Delgado

Nominated by:

Children of the sea, Ecuador

Website: http://www.jocotoco.org

Located along a well-established tourist route, the Choco-Tumbesian region is one of the most threatened biodiversity hotspots globally.  The Las Tunas community is located in coastal dry to semi-humid forests that are threatened by over-harvesting, burning, over-grazing, habitat loss, reduction in water availability, and pollution. Seaborne pollution threatens the Green and Loggerhead turtles. Settlements dump waste into the Ayampe river, on which the ecosystem and globally threatened species such as the Esmereldas Woodstar, the world’s second smallest hummingbird, and the Great Green Macaw, and communities downstream depend. The project will involve communities in cleaning the river and beaches, influencing them to change their behaviour. 11 km of river, 2000ha of forest and 40ha of turtle nesting area will be cleaned by school children. A control hut at the river entrance will reduce the problem of illegal waste dumping. Signs erected along beaches and roads will highlight the issue and a tourist tax will make this project sustainable.  Workshops will teach women to make handicrafts, provide local food and accommodation. 5,000 native seedlings will be planted on 6ha of degraded land as food for the Woodstar and macaw.

Voting has ended
Rubbish left outside the cave

Nominated by:

Nationwide Cave Cleanup, Mauritius

Website: http://www.eraindianocean.org

Mauritius has over 140 lava caves, which are home to the endangered Mauritius free-tailed bat and native swiftlets as well as other wildlife which depends on guano.  A popular tourist attraction for visitors, cavers and the more adventurous, the number of bats has decreased by almost 80% in the past 2 decades due to disturbance of their roosts and habitat loss.  Bat roosts are currently only found in 3 caves, which are vulnerable to dumping of household waste, fire and vandalism and swiftlet nests are harvested for food. Around 140 of the caves on the island will be monitored for waste and also presence of bats and swiftlets, to update the IUCN status of swiftlets. Waste will be cleared from at least 50 caves, and the entrances of key roosting caves secured.  Habitat around key caves will be enriched with native and endemic vegetation.  Signs and posters about the fragile cave habitat and its conservation needs will be displayed next to each major cave which currently has or has had bat and swiftlet populations, along with ways to visit them responsibly.

Voting has ended
Beach Clean Up Inventory

Nominated by:

Reducing plastic waste in the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

Website: http://www.corcovadofoundation.org

The Osa Peninsula is home to half of all the species in Costa Rica. This diverse and fragile bio-region harbours 13 major ecosystems from sea level to 745m, with mangroves, sandy beaches, and primary forests, including coastal lowland rainforests. There are 700 species of trees, 117 species of reptiles and amphibians, 365 species of birds, and over 120 species of mammals. Osa’s surrounding oceans are teeming with cetaceans and features the longest humpbacked whale season in the world.  The main threat is plastic pollution on both land and sea, in particular to marine wildlife, such as the Green, Olive Ridley, and Hawksbill turtles that nest there. This project will increase awareness and understanding of the impact of single use plastic through education and activities involving 400 school and high school students, and 60 children participating in a proactive leadership programme. The focus is to reduce solid waste through proper disposal and substantial reduction of single use plastics ultimately making “Osa Free of Plastic”. Information, training and resources will encourage companies and communities to reduce and eventually eliminate consumption of single use plastic.

Voting has ended
Nature Trails at San Quintín

Nominated by:

Reduction of plastic pollution in the wetlands of Baja California, Mexico

Website: http://www.proesteros.org

This project is located in five wetlands of the Baja California Peninsula, on the coastlines of the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of California and attracts huge numbers of divers, hikers, kayakers, and bird and whale watchers. Wetlands provide resting, breeding and feeding areas for a great variety of land and marine animals and plants, including migratory birds, whales and turtles, play an important role in worldwide climate regulation, sequestering millions of tons of carbon, and for many families, are a vital source of income from tourism activities.  However, the fragile ecosystems are impacted by plastic waste pollution, human disturbance, overfishing, inundation zones deforestation, waste water discharges and brine from desalination plants. This project will work with communities and businesses to ensure local government provides better waste management services, reduce / eliminate waste and plastic and get commitments from tourism businesses and local families to go plastic free.  2 trained teams in each of the 5 wetland areas will organise clean ups in each area.  Citizen science activities will include monitoring bird and turtle nesting sites as well as data analysis of the trash collected.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust