Alpine


Supported by Alpin magazine in Germany since 2010, this category contains those projects located in some of the tallest, steepest, coldest, most inaccessible and most breathtaking areas of the world. 5 projects are all asking for your help in gaining support from the European Outdoor Conservation Association in 2014.
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

If you would prefer to vote in German you can visit the Alpin website or visit our German website.

Voting in this category runs from 17th to 31st March 2014.

 

Looking For Your Support


Nominated by:

Bla Bheinn Path Repair, Isle of Skye, Scotland

Website: http://www.jmt.org

Bla Bheinn (pronounced Blaven) is one of Britain’s most magnificent mountains. It guards the entrance to the Black Cuillin range on the Isle of Skye, rugged and elemental wild land ringed by coastal villages, sea lochs and native woodland. The breath-taking view from its summit and relatively simple access mean high footfall, which combined with rainfall has led to serious erosion on sections of the path. This has damaged fragile soil and plants on the hillside and caused sedimentation of nearby streams, as well as a prominent scar visible for miles. The John Muir Trust plans to repair the 3.8km Bla Bheinn path, using its proven ‘light touch’ methods to preserve the wild character of the area and protect the fragile mountain habitats. Working with local contractors and volunteers, the project will also raise awareness of how sensitive path repair work can allow continued access to such wonderful places with minimal impact.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Conservation of Glorieta stream, Spain

Website: http://www.assoc-cen.org

The main aim of this project is to guarantee the long term conservation of the Glorieta stream headwaters. The site is protected by the Natura 2000 Network of the Prades Mountains. The deep pools, long waterfalls, and turquoise waters are admired by thousands every year, including those that come specifically to hike and canyon. The area is rich in endangered species such as the white clawed crayfish, red tailed barbell and white throated dipper. The main threats are the increasing numbers of visitors, litter, graffiti and damage caused by visitors, and exotic invasive plant and animal species. Through CEN, this project will organise several clean up events, remove invasive species and raise awareness amongst local schools and businesses about the importance of the area. It will also negotiate with groups to regulate canyoning and fence off the most sensitive areas and highlight ‘safe’ routes and responsible behaviour.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

From Red Tarn to Crinkle Crags, Lake District, UK

Website: www.fixthefells.co.uk

The upland path between Red Tarn and Crinkle Crags is a popular Lakeland route, with thousands of walkers visiting each year. Combined with the high rainfall in the Lake District this has resulted in serious erosion of the route causing rainwater to be channelled downhill, washing away soil, rock and aggregate and into streams and lakes where the siltation results in poor water quality, affecting important species like Artic Char, fresh water crayfish and water voles. Through the project, Fix The Fells will restore 1000m of stone pitched path, train 20 new volunteer lengthsmen to carryout footpath repairs and provide 500 volunteer days on upland path repair and restoration work, on this and other routes in the Lake District. Many volunteers involved in the project are undergoing rehabilitation to address issues such as substance misuse or are suffering mental health problems and this project provides a potentially life-changing opportunity and the chance to improve and enhance their mental, physical and spiritual health.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Kanchenjunga to Makalu: conserving Himalayan landscapes

Website: http://www.mountain.org

The landscape corridor between the world’s third and fifth tallest mountains, Kanchenjunga and Makalu, contains some of Nepal’s best ‘off the beaten track’ trekking with rich biodiversity and concentrations of threatened and endangered species including the snow leopard, red panda and Asiatic black bear. Extreme poverty and a lack of economic alternatives are forcing local communities to overharvest commercially valuable medicinal plants, overgraze grasslands and illegally fell timber for Tibetan markets. Through this project, The Mountain Institute will identify and work with 5-6 homestays along the trekking route in eco-tourism. It will also train at least 160 people locally in cultivating medicinal and aromatic plants – to reduce extinction of wild populations and provide higher income than by illegally felling timber. In addition, 50 families will receive low pollution fuel efficient cook stoves to reduce firewood use and degraded slopes will be reforested using the economically valuable Himalayan Yew Tree.

Voting has ended

Nominated by:

Protecting forests in Southern Patagonia

Website: http://www.karukinka.cl

Karukinka is a magnificent 300,000 ha reserve sheltering unique Patagonian landscapes and wildlife and protects the largest intact stand of old growth lenga beech in the southern hemisphere, covering more than 500 square miles. One of the most important zones is La Paciencia Valley which sees the start of a 32km hiking route parallel to the Sanchez river. However the use of fires and camping in unauthorised sites or sites without proper infrastructure is common and human-induced fires in this region have devastated thousands of hectares of native forests. The Wildlife Conservation Society aims to educate hikers, fishermen, local tourism providers, visitors, schools and land owners about the threat of fires and managing rubbish and will establish camping areas and construct fire pits to keep fires under control.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust