Alpine


This category contains those projects located in some of the tallest, steepest, coldest, most inaccessible and most breathtaking areas of the world. See below for the projects which are asking for your help in gaining support from the European Outdoor Conservation Association this year.
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 8 March (00.01 GMT) to 22 March (12.00 GMT) 2016.

 

Looking For Your Support

Goats Water.  Image Alan Waters

Nominated by:

Caring for Coniston’s Old Man, UK

Website: http://www.nurturelakeland.org

The route from Goat's Water to the summit of the Old Man of Coniston snakes around this serene lake and under the spectacular, brooding cliffs of Dow Crag. It is one of the most popular routes in the Lake District National Park bringing thousands of walkers every year, many en route to the summit of Coniston Old Man, one of the park’s highest peaks. But the impact of millions of footsteps on the fragile terrain is causing massive erosion,  scarring to the landscape and impacting on vulnerable vegetation. Sediment from erosion is causing problems in water bodies downstream and rare vegetation and rock features are being damaged when walkers stray from the path. The funding will enable repairs to the path using traditional techniques during the summer of 2016 and reseeding and ongoing maintenance work will keep this famous path in good repair for future

Voting has ended
Tree nursery.  Image Liesje Birchenough

Nominated by:

Conserving Central Asia's Ancient Fruit and Nut Forests

Website: http://www.fauna-flora.org

Central Asia’s endangered fruit and nut forests are vital to the communities living in the landscape as well as being of international biodiversity importance. Home to the wild ancestor of the domestic apple, they offer global adaptability to climate change, and provide vital ecosystem services such as water regulation and erosion control. Some of the poorest communities in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan depend heavily upon the forests for food, medicinal plants, firewood, hay and livestock grazing. This current use is unsustainable, severely degrading the forests. This project will promote more sustainable income-generation initiatives like honey selling and community-based tourism: training a network of hosts and guides, and developing visitor activities and leaflets. Forest protection will be encouraged by planting 4,000 fast-growing saplings for firewood and construction needs, fencing threatened tree species to protect from grazing and delivering creative outdoor educational activities in schools. 

Voting has ended
Lone winter pine.

Nominated by:

Rewilding the Highlands, Scotland

Website: http://www.treesforlife.org.uk

Trees for Life’s Rewilding the Highlands project aims to establish one of the UK’s most inspiring examples of rewilding – featuring habitat creation for endangered or rare wildlife such as golden eagle, Scottish wildcat, red squirrel and pine marten, the planting of 50,000 trees, a boost for wildlife tourism, and 10,000 rare montane tree species being grown each year to re-establish higher altitude woodlands. Centrepiece of the project is Dundreggan Conservation Estate – a ‘lost world’ biodiversity hotspot where more than 3,000 species have been discovered, including 10 found nowhere else in the UK and others that are extremely rare. The 4,000-hectare estate welcomes over 300 volunteers annually, part of an exciting 250-year vision to save Scotland's ancient Caledonian Forest. Engaging with local communities is an important part of the initiative, including support to enhance biodiversity at nearby community project Glengarry Community Woodland.

Voting has ended
Young Mountain Gorilla.  Image Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund

Nominated by:

Saving Mountain Gorillas, Rwanda

Website: http://www.gorillafund.org

This world-renowned long-term project strives to protect the world’s remaining mountain gorillas.  The population monitored by The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund lives in the high altitude forests of the Rwandan section of the Virunga massif, featuring 8 volcanoes, dense forests and a high concentration and diversity of endangered species and plants.  However the area is bordered by one of Africa’s densest urban populations and extreme poverty means communities often use resources from within the national park including water, wood and bushmeat.  The goal of this project is to increase daily monitoring and protection of mountain gorilla groups, remove snares, expand anti-poaching patrols, and help local communities benefit from conservation.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
    The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust