Alpine


This category contains those projects located in some of the tallest, steepest, coldest, most inaccessible and most breathtaking areas of the world. See below for the projects which are asking for your help in gaining support from the European Outdoor Conservation Association this year.
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

This category of projects is also being supported by Mountainblog and you can visit their website, read about the projects in Italian and vote here.

Voting in this category runs from 22nd September (00.01GMT) to 6th October (23.59 GMT) 2014.

 

Looking For Your Support

Forest Park Enrty

Nominated by:

Conservation of Rwanda’s chimpanzees

Website: http://rwanda.wcs.org/

Nyungwe National Park, is a globally important montane rainforest covering over 1000 km2 with 13 species of primates, including the endangered eastern chimpanzee which has a population of about 400. Key threats are forest loss, degradation and fire, often started accidentally by people collecting honey, or harvesting forest products. Chimpanzee tourism provides key income to the park; however it is currently focussed on one group in an isolated forest fragment, putting stresses on this small population. This project aims to secure the long term sustainability of chimpanzee tourism in Nyungwe by establishing great ape tourism best practices and creating 20km of trails and 2 campsites to facilitate access to other chimpanzee groups in the main forest block of Nyungwe. It will also restore 30 hectares of chimpanzee habitat degraded by fire through assisted natural regeneration, support fire prevention and readiness meetings and organise school visits to promote awareness.

Voting has ended
Red Panda in Batase Forest

Nominated by:

Conserving Red Pandas,  Nepal

Website: http://redpandanetwork.org/

The Red Panda is an indicator of healthy subalpine forests. The Kanchenjunga Singhalila Complex (KMC) in Eastern Nepal and the Panchthar-llam-Taplejung (PIT) corridor support 25% of the red panda population of Nepal. However the PIT corridor is not protected and there is pressure from livestock grazing, exploitation of fuel wood collection and encroachment by locals which has led to the degradation and fragmentation of the habitat, resulting in the isolation of panda populations. This will be addressed by assessing the quality of the red panda habitat, developing a management plan for the area and training Community Forest User Groups in forest fire management. 250 households will be supported in red panda conservation, including red panda monitoring, organic farming methods, training of 10 nature guides and 20 households in tourism provision and promoting stall feeding of cattle. Finally, 3500 locals will be educated on the values of conserving broad leaf forests through promotional material, a media campaign, events and a school outreach campaign.

Voting has ended
Mountain Landscapes

Nominated by:

Mountain Forests Catalonia 2015

Website: http://www.projecteboscos.cat

Offering outdoor users a new vision of the outdoors through real experiences working with professional foresters and conservationists. This project will fund 9 weeks of volunteer work in the Catalan Pyrenees and include activities such as forest thinning and restoration, path restoration, native tree replanting, canal restoration and bio-engineering work against erosion.

Voting has ended
Red Panda Habitat.  Image Tenzing Sherpa

Nominated by:

Red panda and Tourism in the Darjeeling Himalayas

Website: http://www.atree.org

The beautiful, fragile and biologically rich landscape of Singhalila National Park in Darjeeling, India has views of the world’s highest mountains and is home to the threatened red panda. Declared a national park in 1992/93, there was a shift in community livelihoods from cattle husbandry to tourism, which increased by 250% in the first 10 years. Currently 70% of local communities depend on tourism for their livelihoods, however challenges such as littering along trekking trails and at destinations are threatening wildlife habitats and the sustainability of tourism in Singhalila. Local guides, accompanying visitors, are not adequately trained to teach visitors about the park environment and their responsibilities. This project will carry out 10 awareness raising and clean-up events in 5 different locations, establish waste management booths at 3 entry/exit points to the park and train 10 trainers who will in turn train 50 guides in reducing litter in the park from their visitors and respecting the park while visiting it

Voting has ended
Morning View!

Nominated by:

Restoring Roaches Footpaths, UK

Website: http://www.staffs-wildlife.org.uk

The 400 hectare Roaches Estate in the Peak District National Park is internationally important for its upland wildlife (including red grouse and peregrine) and its rock climbing. It draws over 100,000 visitors, mainly walkers and climbers, and is renowned as a great place for first time climbers and those who are more experienced. However, the area’s popularity has left huge erosion scars on the landscape, disturbing the surrounding habitat as visitors cut new paths to avoid treacherous conditions. Not only are these scars ugly, the loss of habitat is affecting the wildlife population and threatens the water quality of nearby Tittesworth reservoir which provides much of the local drinking water. This project will totally reverse the damage, restoring 20km of paths using traditional footpath techniques which will minimise future maintenance. Drainage will be improved and areas re-landscaped to allow areas to recover.

Voting has ended
Dramatic coastline

Nominated by:

Wildfjords Restoration, Iceland

Website: http://www.wildfjordsrestoration.org

The project is located in Iceland’s wild and mountainous West Fjords region, a landscape of rugged rock and steep sided fjords. Though retaining its wild character, land use has dramatically altered the ecology, with approximately 95% of the original forest cover removed, wetlands drained for farmland and non-native tree species planted. Increasing tourism also threatens the region’s sensitive flora. Working with local partners, the project will restore native boreal birch forests via propagating and planting 10,000 native tree seedlings, which will support lichen, insect and fungi populations. Internationally important waterfowl wetlands will also be restored by filling in ditches, and ancient cairns will be mapped and restored in a newly proposed national park, Látrabjarg. Cairn restoration will create a network of walking trails while ensuring impact on fragile habitats is kept to a minimum. The project will create an integrated management plan between public and private sectors, prioritising bio-diversity, and will offer an alternative to current decision making procedures.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust