Rewilding the Highlands, Scotland

Trees for Life has the goal of restoring the Caledonian Forest, and all its constituent species of flora and fauna to the Scottish highlands. It enlists volunteers of all ages in the practical work to achieve this, and promotes the work of restoration and increased support for the return of the forest.

 
Lone winter pine.
Lone winter pine.

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The Project

Trees for Life’s Rewilding the Highlands project aims to establish one of the UK’s most inspiring examples of rewilding – featuring habitat creation for endangered or rare wildlife such as golden eagle, Scottish wildcat, red squirrel and pine marten, the planting of 50,000 trees, a boost for wildlife tourism, and 10,000 rare montane tree species being grown each year to re-establish higher altitude woodlands. Centrepiece of the project is Dundreggan Conservation Estate – a ‘lost world’ biodiversity hotspot where more than 3,000 species have been discovered, including 10 found nowhere else in the UK and others that are extremely rare. The 4,000-hectare estate welcomes over 300 volunteers annually, part of an exciting 250-year vision to save Scotland's ancient Caledonian Forest. Engaging with local communities is an important part of the initiative, including support to enhance biodiversity at nearby community project Glengarry Community Woodland.  This project will:
- introduce people to the concept of rewilding via planting and biodiversity skills days for the public
- involve local communities in rewilding events, including planting small groves of native trees in key places
- expand native woodland and Dundreggan and Glengarry by creating 3 new areas of native woodlands over 200 hectares and planting 50,000 trees.
 
Tree Planting at Dundreggan.  Image Craig Dickson
Tree Planting at Dundreggan. Image Craig Dickson
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If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below. During 2017, all money donated will fund tree planting in Nepal as part of our 2 Million Tree Project.
We are hugely grateful for the support of the European Outdoor Conservation Association, without whose support we could never have realised such an ambitious project.
Hugo Tagholm, Surfers Against Sewage